Nothing worthwhile ever happens quickly and easily. You achieve only as you are determined to achieve … and you keep at it until you have achieved ☼ Robert H. Lauer

Opinion☼ rss

Atul Gawande’s Pain Control and Palliative Care

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October 10, 2014

The ever affable author, doctor, and notable writer of “The Cost Conundrum,” article in the New Yorker back in 2009 (available here), instigating a movement posing serious questions and critiques of the U.S. healthcare system, has now endorsed Pain Control and Palliative Care. Topically related to his new book, Being Mortal, and what really matters… Read More ›

The Security Manifesto of Schiphol

I remember the first time I returned to my hometown after spending my first year abroad. My connecting flight was routed through Schiphol airport in Amsterdam, and the incredible security measures at LAX were so surprising I remember them every time I fly back to the US. Drug detecting dogs descended on the line of weary passengers…. Read More ›

Capstone vs. Capstone

As my time at the Harvard Kennedy School comes to a close, I had the opportunity to attend a lunchtime panel where the impending HKS graduates shared their experiences on their capstone presentations. It wasn’t a full-scale synopsis, as the purpose of the panel appeared to be to thank the Ash Center for providing travel… Read More ›

Finding Justice for Kate Puzey

My foreign staffer friend on Capitol Hill forwarded an email to me yesterday, which details a petition seeking justice for slain Peace Corps volunteer, Kate Puzey. Most people I know in the PCV and RPCV community are familiar with Kate’s case. It was highly relevant to my own Peace Corps service in China, which began… Read More ›

Another Operation Kindred Spirit? Probably Not.

Are spies from China infiltrating our academic prowess here in the U.S.? Xia Yeliang, a former Economics Professor at Peking University, apparently thinks so. Of the increasing numbers of headlines dedicated to Chinese intelligence activities in the U.S., most have been exclusively related to Industrial Espionage. Ever since the Wen Ho Lee incident, dubbed Operation… Read More ›

World Wise Schools and the Third Goal (It’s a Small World After all!)

When recently perusing the archives for the IAG Awards at the Harvard Kennedy School, I couldn’t help but notice a series of programs from the 1998 submission pool which included entries that were all too familiar. Among the over 1,400 submissions for the year, were three Peace Corps programs I personally came to know and… Read More ›

The Intern’s Glass: Harmony Through Omission

After two weeks in my new position at the World Health Organization, I finally solidified my status as an intern by paying a visit to the Ekonomat to receive my souvenir glass. To promote sustainability, the WHO follows like-minded organizations by promoting reusable glasses opposed to disposable cups. A kind man accepted the hard copy… Read More ›

Visa Drama Visa!

I applied for a post one time as a consulate adjudicator in China (unsuccessfully). As a contract position with the Foreign Service, it came with free accommodation, double holidays (both Chinese and American) and a generous starting salary in US dollars. One thing I’ll never understand: If consulate life is so sweet, then why are… Read More ›

Liters of Light

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line last Monday, the entire city was flabbergasted. Friends, loved ones, and even professors checked in to make sure I was ok. All we knew was that a graduate student from BU was dead, but no one knew who. We were constantly reminded to stay… Read More ›

Housing Scams: Beware!

Recently, when hunting for summer housing in Switzerland, the strangest thing happened. I don’t completely grasp the logistics of the operation, but I may have accidentally unearthed an institution! It started with an apartment, a perfect space to live the life I’ve always dreamed – only appropriate when about to undergo the opportunity of a… Read More ›